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MOOC Grading

One of the more challenging aspects of working with a MOOC provider to improve assessments (or, as I prefer to call them: “Active Learning Components”) is what all this assessment (sorry “Active Learning”) is supposed to add up to. After all, the way to improve MOOC quizzes and exams is by applying appropriate elements of […]

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My HarvardX “Embed”

As some of you already know, I’ve recently started a six-month engagement as the inaugural Visiting Fellow at HarvardX. During that time, I’ll be focusing on how to improve assessment within HarvardX’s growing catalog of online learning experiences (which I’ve already learned should not all be described under the term “courses”). And my mandate (and […]

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Learning by Doing

Well my break from blogging was not accompanied by a break from thinking about the subject of learning, especially that mix of real world and virtual learning experiences that might ultimately lead to a genuine rewriting of the rules of education. The first experience which triggered this line of thought came from a visit to […]

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MOOC Infographics

Every few weeks, someone seems to reach out and let me know about an interesting MOOC infographic that highlights important information (facts, stats, etc.) regarding some aspect of massive open online learning. I’ve let them collect, waiting for a day when other obligations takes precedent over generating new material for the blog.   And with tomorrow’s […]

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Hacking Homework

“Hacking” is a verb that’s attached itself to all kinds of nouns these days, generating phrases meant to imply working around standard operating procedures in order to achieve an end result as good or better (and often more quickly) than what you’d get by following the rules. The concept obviously originates in the computer programming […]

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MOOC Testing – Distractors

A friend recently gave a presentation at a local Ted event, and while his was my first interface with the whole bean-bag-chair, Google-Glass, clearly-of-West-Coast-origin Ted experience, it did remind me that I still needed to watch this Ted presentation by Daphne Koller, co-founder of Coursera.  She gave the talk in 2012, back when MOOC-mania was […]

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MOOCs and Grading – Interpreting Obviousity Results

Getting back to the Obviousity scores we looked at a couple of days ago, the lessons to be drawn even from my simple experiment go beyond just reinforcing the need to follow the professional item-writing principles, like those I recommended a few months back. Yes, MOOC developers should avoid true/false questions and do a better […]

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MOOCs and Grading – Obviousity Results

OK, so I ran my Obviousity Index test on several of the classes I’ve taken (not enough for a comprehensive scientific analysis, but enough to inform this conversation). Remember from yesterday that the Obviousity Index is derived from looking at MOOC courses where the final grade is based entirely on how a student performs in […]

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MOOCs and Grading – The Obviousity Index

As many readers know, my background in professional test design has left me sensitive to MOOC quizzes and exams that sometimes seem thrown together as afterthoughts. This is because in the best designed courses, instruction and assessment (whether in the form of quizzes, final exams, graded papers and homework assignments) work hand in hand to […]

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MOOC Assignments – Screwing Up

I can’t tell you how exciting it’s been to actually blow some questions in my most recent MOOC assignment. I’ve talked before about how assessment and other scored exercises tend to get short shrift within many MOOCs.  In some cases, this manifests itself as test questions or homework assignments that are ambiguously worded or confusing.  […]

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